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Banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa)

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Also listed as: Lagerstroemia speciosa
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-alpha/beta-D-glucose, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid, 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylellagic acid, 3,4,8,9,10-pentahydroxydibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one, 3-beta,23-dihydroxy-1-oxo-olean-12-en-28-oic acid, 3-O-methylellagic acid, 3-O-methyl-ellagic acid 4'-sulfate, 24-methylenecycloartanol acetate, 31-norlargerenol acetate, banaba extract, banglang (Vietnamese), bang-lang (Cambodian), bungor (Malay, Sabah), Byers Wonderful White crape myrtle, casuarinin, corosolic acid (2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid), crape myrtle, crepe myrtle, ellagic derivatives, ellagitannins (flosin B, reginin A, lagerstroemin), epipunicacortein A, glucosal, GlucosolT, intanin (Thailand), jarul (India), lageracetal, Lagerstroemia, Lagerstroemia flos-reginae Retz., Lagerstroemia indica, Lagerstroemia parviflora, Lagerstroemia speciosa, lagertannin, largerenol acetate, lasubine, lutein, Lythraceae (family), Lythraceae alkaloids, Munchausia speciosa, penta-O-galloyl-glucopyranose, phytol, Pride-of-India, pyinma, Queen's crape myrtle, Queen's flower, sitosterol, sitosterol acetate, stachyurin, tinotufolin C, tinotufolin D, tripernoid.

Background
  • Banaba is a medicinal plant that grows in India, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines. It is a folk medicine for patients with diabetes in the Philippines and Southeast Asia. The blood sugar-lowering effect of banaba leaf extract is similar to that of insulin, which induces glucose transport from the blood into body cells.
  • Banaba is used in Asia, Australia, and the East Indies for timber and is commonly used as an ornament.
  • Currently, some evidence suggests that taking banaba extract by mouth, standardized to 1% corosolic acid, may lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. However, further research is needed before a firm conclusion can be drawn.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *


Preliminary research investigating the effects of banaba on diabetes has reported promising results. However, additional research is necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn.

C
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumor, antitussive, antiviral, coronary artery disease, dyspepsia (stomach upset), gout, high blood pressure, kidney disease, kidney toxicity, lipid-lowering (cholesterol and triglycerides), metabolic syndrome, obesity, osteoporosis, pregnancy (gestational trophoblastic disease [GTD]/pregnancy-related tumors), weight loss.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • For diabetes, 32 and 48 milligrams of banaba leaf extract, standardized to 1% corosolic acid (GlucosolTM) has been taken by mouth daily for two weeks.

Children (younger than 18 years)

  • There is no proven effective dose for banaba in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to banaba, its constituents, or any members of the Lythraceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Banaba may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or hypoglycemia and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Banaba may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that lower blood pressure.
  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to banaba, its constituents, or any members of the Lythraceae family.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Banaba is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Banaba may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
  • Banaba may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that lower blood pressure.
  • Banaba may also interact with antibiotics, anticancer agents, antifungals, antigout agents, anti-inflammatory agents, antiobesity agents, antivirals, cholesterol-lowering agents, dopamine agonists, organic anion-transporting polypeptide B substrates, and osteoporosis drugs.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Banaba may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
  • Banaba may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that lower blood pressure.
  • Banaba may also interact with antibacterials, anticancer agents, antifungals, antigout agents, anti-inflammatory agents, antiobesity agents, antioxidants, antivirals, cholesterol-lowering agents, dopamine agonists, organic anion-transporting polypeptide B substrates, and osteoporosis agents.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Cagayan, M. S. and Oras, C. M. Use of complementary and alternative medicines among women with gestational trophoblastic diseases: a survey at the Philippine General Hospital. J Reprod.Med 2010;55(7-8):327-332.
  2. Chistokhodova N, Nguyen C, Calvino T, et al. Antithrombin activity of medicinal plants from central Florida. J Ethnopharmacol 2002;81(2):277-280.
  3. Choi, H. J., Bae, E. Y., Song, J. H., Baek, S. H., and Kwon, D. H. Inhibitory effects of orobol 7-O-D-glucoside from banaba (Lagerstroemia speciosa L.) on human rhinoviruses replication. Lett.Appl.Microbiol. 2010;51(1):1-5.
  4. Fukushima, M., Matsuyama, F., Ueda, N., Egawa, K., Takemoto, J., Kajimoto, Y., Yonaha, N., Miura, T., Kaneko, T., Nishi, Y., Mitsui, R., Fujita, Y., Yamada, Y., and Seino, Y. Effect of corosolic acid on postchallenge plasma glucose levels. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2006;73(2):174-177.
  5. Hattori K, Sukenobu N, Sasaki T, et al. Activation of insulin receptors by lagerstroemin. J Pharmacol Sci 2003;93(1):69-73.
  6. Hayashi T, Maruyama H, Kasai R, et al. Ellagitannins from Lagerstroemia speciosa as activators of glucose transport in fat cells. Planta Med 2002;68(2):173-175.
  7. Hong H, Jai Maeng W. Effects of malted barley extract and banaba extract on blood glucose levels in genetically diabetic mice. J Med Food 2004;7(4):487-490.
  8. Hosoyama H, Sugimoto A, Suzuki Y, et al. [Isolation and quantitative analysis of the alpha-amylase inhibitor in Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers. (Banaba)]. Yakugaku Zasshi 2003;123(7):599-605.
  9. Judy WV, Hari SP, Stogsdill WW, et al. Antidiabetic activity of a standardized extract (Glucosol) from Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves in Type II diabetics. A dose-dependence study. J Ethnopharmacol 2003;87(1):115-117.
  10. Kakuda T, Sakane I, Takihara T, et al. Hypoglycemic effect of extracts from Lagerstroemia speciosa L. leaves in genetically diabetic KK-AY mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1996;60(2):204-208.
  11. Klein, G., Kim, J., Himmeldirk, K., Cao, Y., and Chen, X. Antidiabetes and Anti-obesity Activity of Lagerstroemia speciosa. Evid.Based Complement Alternat.Med 2007;4(4):401-407.
  12. Matsuura T, Yoshikawa Y, Masui H, et al. [Suppression of glucose absorption by various health teas in rats.] [Article in Japanese.]. Yakugaku Zasshi 4;124(4):217-223.
  13. Murakami C, Myoga K, Kasai R, et al. Screening of plant constituents for effect on glucose transport activity in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 1993;41(12):2129-2131.
  14. Suzuki Y, Unno T, Ushitani M, et al. Antiobesity activity of extracts from Lagerstroemia speciosa L. leaves on female KK-Ay mice. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1999;45(6):791-795.
  15. Unno T, Sugimoto A, Kakuda T. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers. J Ethnopharmacol 2004;93(2-3):391-395.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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