Table of Contents > Alternative Modalities > Enhansa® Print

Enhansa®

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Related terms
Background
Theory/evidence
Safety
Author information
Bibliography
Dosing

Related Terms
  • Amomoum curcuma, anlatone (constituent), ar-turmerone, CUR, Curcuma, Curcuma aromatica, Curcuma aromatica salisbury, Curcuma domestica, Curcuma domestica valet, Curcuma longa, Curcuma longa Linn, Curcuma longa rhizoma, curcuma oil, curcumin, curminoids, diferuloylmethane, E zhu, enhansa, Gelbwurzel (German), gurkemeje (Danish), haldi, Haridra (Sanskrit), Indian saffron, Indian yellow root, jiang huang (Mandarin Chinese), kunir, kunyit, Kurkumawurzelstock (German), kyoo (Japanese), NT, number ten, Olena, radix zedoaria longa, resveratrol, rhizome de curcuma, safran des Indes (French), sesquiterpenoids, shati, turmeric, turmeric oil, turmeric root, turmerone (constituent), Ukon (Japanese), yellowroot, zedoary, Zingiberaceae (family), zingiberene, Zitterwurzel (German).

Background
  • Enhansa®, manufactured by Lee Silsby Compounding Pharmacy, is a dietary supplement that contains enhanced-absorption curcumin as the active ingredient. It is available as capsules or a powder and is designed to be taken once or twice daily.
  • Curcumin, the compound responsible for the bright yellow color of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is believed to be the principal pharmacological agent.
  • In general, evidence from human and animal studies suggests that curcumin may be poorly absorbed into the bloodstream. The manufacturer claims that Enhansa® may be 7-8 times more absorbable than standard curcumin extracts.
  • The manufacturer also claims that curcumin may help treat autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) because it reduces the levels of inflammatory markers and other chemicals usually elevated in such diseases. According to the manufacturer, curcumin may decrease levels of oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, which has been shown to be elevated in people with autism.
  • However, sufficient evidence is lacking on the safety and effectiveness of Enhansa®.

Theory / Evidence
  • Enhansa®: There is currently a lack of third-party research testing safety and effectiveness of Enhansa®. Human and animal evidence suggests that curcumin may be poorly absorbed into the bloodstream.
  • The manufacturer claims that Enhansa® may be 7-8 times more absorbable than standard curcumin extracts. However, studies supporting this claim are not identified on the Lee Silsby Web site, and it is unclear where the information was obtained from.
  • The manufacturer claims that curcumin increases glutathione within the cells; reduces inflammatory markers and oxidized glutathione levels linked to autism; improves liver detoxification; chelates lead and cadmium and protects against mercury toxicity; and acts as an antiviral, antifungal, potential PPAR-gamma agonist, and NF-kappa-B inhibitor.
  • However, sufficient evidence on the safety and effectiveness is currently unavailable to make a conclusion.
  • Turmeric/curcumin: It has been suggested that curcumin, the active ingredient in Enhansa®, may have beneficial effects for various medical conditions. However, supportive evidence from available human studies is unclear or conflicting.
  • Antioxidant:In clinical research, a specific component of turmeric (NCB-02) had positive effects on endothelial function and its biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes. More well-designed human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • Blood clot prevention: Early research suggests that turmeric may prevent the formation of blood clots. More research is needed to determine if turmeric is effective for this condition.
  • Cancer: Several early animal and laboratory studies report that curcumin may have anticancer effects against colon, skin, and breast cancer. The specific way in which turmeric or curcumin exhibits anticancer properties may be due to its antioxidant activity, its prevention of new blood vessel growth, or its direct effects on cancer cells. More research is needed to determine the potential role turmeric or curcumin has in preventing or treating human cancers.
  • Cognitive function: Curcumin has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and to reduce burden due to plaque buildup in lab studies. However, there is currently not enough evidence to suggest the use of curcumin for cognitive performance.
  • Dyspepsia (indigestion): Turmeric has been traditionally used to treat stomach problems such as indigestion. Some early evidence suggests that turmeric may offer some relief from these stomach problems. However, at high doses or with extended use, turmeric may actually irritate or upset the stomach. More human studies in this area are needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • Gallstone prevention/bile flow stimulant: Early studies report that curcumin may decrease the occurrence of gallstones. Human studies are lacking in this area, and more research is needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • High cholesterol:Early studies suggest that turmeric may lower levels of "bad" cholesterol and total cholesterol in the blood. Well-designed human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • HIV/AIDS:Several laboratory studies suggest that curcumin may have activity against HIV. However, reliable human studies are lacking in this area.
  • Inflammation: Laboratory and animal studies show anti-inflammatory activity of turmeric and curcumin. Reliable human research is lacking.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Early research suggests that Curcuma xanthorriza may have beneficial effects on IBS compared to placebo. More studies are needed to verify these findings.
  • Liver protection: Early research suggests that turmeric may have a protective effect on the liver. More research is needed before any conclusions can be made.
  • Oral leukoplakia: Results from lab and animal studies suggest that turmeric may have anticancer effects. Human studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • Osteoarthritis: Historically, turmeric has been used to treat rheumatic conditions. Laboratory and animal studies show anti-inflammatory activity of turmeric and curcumin, which may be beneficial in people with osteoarthritis. More human research is needed.
  • Peptic ulcer disease (stomach ulcer): Turmeric has been used historically to treat stomach ulcers. At high doses or extended use, however, turmeric may actually irritate or upset the stomach. Currently, there is not enough human evidence to make a conclusion.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Turmeric has been used historically to treat rheumatic conditions, and based on animal research, it may reduce inflammation. More research is needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • Scabies: Historically, turmeric has been used on the skin to treat long-lasting skin ulcers and scabies. It has also been used in combination with the leaves of the herb Azadirachta indica ADR, or neem. More research is needed.
  • Uveitis (eye inflammation): Laboratory and animal studies suggest that turmeric and curcumin may have anti-inflammatory activity. Poorly designed human research suggests a possible benefit of curcumin in the treatment of uveitis. Reliable human research is needed before a conclusion can be made.
  • Viral infection: Early evidence suggests that turmeric may help treat viral infections. More research is needed before a conclusion can be made.

Safety




Author information
  • This information has been edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Aggarwal BB, Kumar A, Bharti AC. Anticancer potential of curcumin: preclinical and clinical studies. Anticancer Res 2003;23(1A):363-398.
  2. Aggarwal BB, Kunnumakkara AB, Harikumar KB, et al. Potential of spice-derived phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Planta Med 2008 Oct;74(13):1560-9.
  3. Deodhar SD, Sethi R, Srimal RC. Preliminary study on antirheumatic activity of curcumin (diferuloyl methane). Indian J Med Res 1980;71:632-34.
  4. Lee Silsby Compounding Pharmacy Web site. Enhansa® product information.
  5. López-Lázaro M. Anticancer and carcinogenic properties of curcumin: considerations for its clinical development as a cancer chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent. Mol Nutr Food Res 2008 Jun;52 Suppl 1:S103-27.
  6. Natural Standard: The Authority on Integrative Medicine.
  7. Polasa K, Naidu AN, Ravindranath I, Krishnaswamy K. Inhibition of B(a)P induced strand breaks in presence of curcumin. Mutat Res 2004 Feb; 557(2): 203-13.
  8. Prusty BK, Das BC. Constitutive activation of transcription factor AP-1 in cervical cancer and suppression of human papillomavirus (HPV) transcription and AP-1 activity in HeLa cells by curcumin. Int J Cancer 3-1-2005;113(6):951-60.
  9. Strimpakos AS, Sharma RA. Curcumin: preventive and therapeutic properties in laboratory studies and clinical trials. Antioxid Redox Signal 2008 Mar;10(3):511-45.
  10. Taher MM, Lammering G, Hershey C, et al. Curcumin inhibits ultraviolet light induced human immunodeficiency virus gene expression. Mol Cell Biochem 2003;254(1-2):289-97.
  11. Usharani P, Mateen AA, Naidu MU, et al. Effect of NCB-02, atorvastatin and placebo on endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, 8-week study. Drugs R D 2008;9(4):243-50.

Dosing

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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