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Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus)



Interactions

Tarragon/Drug Interactions:
  • Antiallergy agentsAntiallergy agents: Based on in vitro study, the presence of a catechol structure in rutin, a compound found in tarragon, inhibits the in vitro ovalbumin permeation through Caco-2 cell monolayers (11).
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Based on in vitro evidence, essential oils and extracts from tarragon may exert antibacterial effects against a range of bacteria (37; 38; 39; 40; 41).
  • Anticonvulsant agentsAnticonvulsant agents: The essential oil of Artemisia dracunculus exerted dose- and time-dependent antiseizure activity in vivo in maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole models of experimental seizures (19).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: In vitro, tarragon lowered phosphor-renolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and gene expression and may affect gluconeogenesis (42). Although confirmation is needed, based on secondary sources, tarragon may enhance the body's ability to utilize naturally occurring insulin, thereby lowering blood glucose levels.
  • Antiemetic agentsAntiemetic agents: Based on a clinical trial, the percutaneous application of a mixture of Zingiber officinale (ginger), Elletaria cardamomum (cardamom), and Artemisia dracunculus (tarragon) essential oils on the anterolateral aspect of the neck relieved symptoms of postoperative nausea and vomiting (7). The effects of tarragon alone cannot be determined from this study.
  • Antifungal agentsAntifungal agents: In vitro study has shown that the essential oil of tarragon contains several forms of 3-butylcoumarins, all of which have antifungal activities (43; 39). In vitro, the essential oil fraction of Artemisia dracunculus L. var. dracunculus demonstrated antifungal activity against Colletrotichum fragariae, Colletrotichum gloeosporioides, and Colletrotichum acutatum, possibly due to the presence of 5-phenyl-1,3-pentadiyne and capillarin (44).
  • Anti-inflammatory agentsAnti-inflammatory agents: In vitro study showed that tarragon is able to suppress, but not scavenge, nitric oxide (NO), which has been implicated in the development of a number of diseases (45).
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: Animal study suggests that very high dosages of estragole, found in tarragon, may increase the risk of liver cancer (2; 5; 24). Based on in vitro research, 7-methoxycoumarin, isolated from tarragon, showed potent inhibitory activities against chemical mediator release from rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells (46). At this time it is not known if estragole is carcinogenic in humans.
  • Antiplatelet agentsAntiplatelet agents: Based on in vitro evidence, tarragon may inhibit platelet adhesion, aggregation, and secretion (14).
  • Cholinesterase inhibitorsCholinesterase inhibitors: Commercially available essential oils extracted from Artemisia dracunculus L. from Hungary did not exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity whereas Artemisia dracunculus L. oil from France demonstrated the most potent inhibitory activity [50% inhibition concentration (IC50)=0.058mg/mL] in vitro (47).
  • CNS depressantsCNS depressants: Based on in vitro evidence, tarragon may endogenously produce substances that are capable of binding to the benzodiazepine receptor (25).
  • Cytochrome P450: substrates, inhibitors, inducersCytochrome P450: substrates, inhibitors, inducers: Estragole has been metabolized by CYP1A2 and CYP2A6, suggesting that the essential oil of tarragon might compete with drugs that use the P450 pathway (48). Although confirmation is needed, based on secondary sources, tarragon may activate CYP3A4 (49). Additional details are currently lacking.
  • Hepatotoxic agentsHepatotoxic agents: Estragole, a constituent of tarragon, produces necrotic changes in hepatocytes in female mice, but edema in male mice (5). Only in female rats, but not male rats or mice, did estragole inhibit the glucocorticoid induction of liver-specific enzyme, tyrosine aminotransferase, and tryptophan oxygenase (2). Furthermore, estragole's hepatocarcinogenicity correlated with the lowered levels of induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and tryptophan oxygenase.
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Based on in vitro evidence, Artemisia dracunculus may inhibit the complement cascade (26).
  • Sedatives/hypnotics/anxiolyticsSedatives/hypnotics/anxiolytics: Based on animal study, Artemisia dracunculus L. may exert sedative effects at doses that produced anticonvulsant activity (19).

Tarragon/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Antiallergy agentsAntiallergy agents: Based on in vitro study, the presence of a catechol structure in rutin, a compound found in tarragon, inhibits the in vitro ovalbumin permeation through Caco-2 cell monolayers (11).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Based on in vitro evidence, essential oils and extracts from tarragon may exert antibacterial effects against a range of bacteria (37; 38; 39; 40; 41).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Based on in vitro evidence, tarragon may inhibit platelet adhesion, aggregation, and secretion (14).
  • AnticonvulsantsAnticonvulsants: In animal study, the essential oil of Artemisia dracunculus exerted dose- and time-dependent antiseizure activity in maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole models of experimental seizures (19).
  • Antiemetic herbs and supplementsAntiemetic herbs and supplements: Based on a clinical trial, the percutaneous application of a mixture of Zingiber officinale (ginger), Elletaria cardamomum (cardamom), and Artemisia dracunculus (tarragon) essential oils on the anterolateral aspect of the neck relieved symptoms of postoperative nausea and vomiting (7). The effects of tarragon alone cannot be determined from this study.
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: In vitro study has shown that the essential oil of tarragon contains several forms of 3-butylcoumarins, all of which have antifungal activities (43; 39). In vitro, essential oil fraction of Artemisia dracunculus L. var. dracunculus demonstrated antifungal activity against Colletrotichum fragariae, Colletrotichum gloeosporioides, and Colletrotichum acutatum, possibly due to the presence of 5-phenyl-1,3-pentadiyne and capillarin (44).
  • Anti-inflammatory herbs and supplementsAnti-inflammatory herbs and supplements: In vitro study showed that tarragon is able to suppress, but not scavenge, nitric oxide (NO), which has been implicated in the development of a number of diseases (45).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Animal study suggests that very high dosages of estragole, found in tarragon, may increase the risk of liver cancer (2; 5; 24). Based on in vitro research, 7-methoxycoumarin, isolated from tarragon, showed potent inhibitory activities against chemical mediator release from rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells (46). At this time it is not known if estragole is carcinogenic in humans.
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: High radical-scavenging activities of tarragon and its constituents have been shown in vitro (50).
  • Cholinesterase inhibitorsCholinesterase inhibitors: Commercially available essential oils extracted from Artemisia dracunculus L. from Hungary did not exhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity, whereas Artemisia dracunculus L. oil from France demonstrated the most potent inhibitory activity [50% inhibition concentration (IC50)=0.058mg/mL in vitro (47).
  • Cytochrome P450: substrates, inhibitors, inducersCytochrome P450: substrates, inhibitors, inducers: Estragole has been metabolized by CYP1A2 and CYP2A6, suggesting that the essential oil of tarragon might compete with drugs that use the P450 pathway (48). Although confirmation is needed, based on secondary sources, tarragon may activate CYP3A4 (49). Additional details are currently lacking.
  • Hepatotoxic herbsHepatotoxic herbs: Estragole, a constituent of tarragon, produces necrotic changes in hepatocytes in female mice, but edema in male mice (5). Only in female rats, but not male rats or mice, did estragole inhibit the glucocorticoid induction of liver-specific enzyme, tyrosine aminotransferase, and tryptophan oxygenase (2). Furthermore, estragole's hepatocarcinogenicity correlated with the lowered levels of induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and tryptophan oxygenase.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: In vitro, tarragon lowered phosphor-renolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and gene expression and may affect gluconeogenesis (42). Tarragon may enhance the body's ability to utilize naturally occurring insulin, thereby lowering blood glucose levels (22).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Based on in vitro evidence, Artemisia dracunculus may inhibit the complement cascade (26).
  • Sedative herbs and supplementsSedative herbs and supplements: Based on animal study, Artemisia dracunculus L. may exert sedative effects at doses that produced anticonvulsant activity (19).

Tarragon/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Tarragon/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood glucoseBlood glucose: In vitro, tarragon lowered phosphor-renolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and gene expression and may affect gluconeogenesis (42).
  • CreatineCreatine: Tarragon may lower blood creatine levels in humans (22).
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Based on in vitro evidence, tarragon may inhibit platelet adhesion, aggregation, and secretion (14).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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