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Celery (Apium graveolens)



Interactions

Celery/Drug Interactions:
  • ACE inhibitorsACE inhibitors: According to a study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of conversion enzyme inhibitors and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (305; 306).
  • AlcoholAlcohol: According to a study of food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of alcohol and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (305; 306).
  • AnalgesicsAnalgesics: In clinical trial, an herbal drug (containing 500 mg of highly purified saffron, celery seed, and anise) was effective in reducing pain associated with primary dysmenorrhea (326). The effects of celery seed alone, however, are unclear.
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Based on review, celery may inhibit platelet aggregation and increase the risk of bleeding with anticoagulants like warfarin (23; 103).
  • AnticonvulsantsAnticonvulsants: Pretreatment with celery juices prolonged action of pentobarbital in animal study (104).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: According to secondary sources and a case report, celery may have hypotensive activity (96).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: Based on animal study, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in celery-treated rats (97; 98; 99). However, based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (97).
  • Antispasmodic agentsAntispasmodic agents: Based on secondary sources, celery may have antispasmodic activity.
  • Antiulcer agentsAntiulcer agents: Antiulcer drugs (including H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors) were found to promote IgE formation toward dietary antigens in celery in adult patients (91).
  • AspirinAspirin: According to study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of aspirin and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (305; 306).
  • Beta-blockersBeta-blockers: According to study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of beta-blockers and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (305; 306).
  • Cytochrome P450-metabolized agentsCytochrome P450-metabolized agents: Based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (97). Celery constituents have been found to inhibit human cytochrome P-450 1A2 (hCYP1A2) activity and hCYP1A2-mediated mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1 (327). A higher activity of cytochrome P450 was also detected in maize and celery exposed to the pollutants (328). Pretreatment with celery juices prolonged action of pentobarbital and the analgesic action of aminopyrine and paracetamol in animal study (104).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: According to secondary sources, celery may have diuretic properties.
  • DoxorubicinDoxorubicin: Celery juice was found to exert a protective effect against doxorubicin toxicity (62).
  • Photosensitizing agentsPhotosensitizing agents: Celery contains phenols and furocoumarins (psoralens) (43; 19; 15; 329; 113; 330; 114; 299; 331; 116; 319; 318; 314; 332; 333; 334; 313; 115). These constituents may act as photosensitizers. Theoretically, concurrent use of celery and photosensitizing agents may increase the risk of sun sensitivity.
  • SalicylatesSalicylates: In comparative study, treatment of celery cells with salicylic acid resulted in increased mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) activity and RNA (335). Increased MTD activity resulted in an increased ability to utilize mannitol.
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on mouse study, 3,n-butylphthalide and sedanenolide isolated from celery oil showed weak sedative activity, prolonged pentobarbital narcosis, and induced sleep immediately following recovery from a prior barbiturate treatment (336).
  • Valproic acidValproic acid: Celery was found in exert a protective effect on reproductive toxicity in rats treated with valproic acid (90).

Celery/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AnalgesicsAnalgesics: In clinical trial, an herbal drug (containing 500 mg of highly purified saffron, celery seed, and anise) was effective in reducing pain associated with primary dysmenorrhea (326). The effects of celery seed alone, however, are unclear.
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Based on review, celery may inhibit platelet aggregation and increase the risk of bleeding with anticoagulants like warfarin (23; 103).
  • AnticonvulsantsAnticonvulsants: Pretreatment with celery juices prolonged action of pentobarbital in animal study (104).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Based on rat study, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in celery-treated rats (97; 98; 99). However, based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (97).
  • AntispasmodicsAntispasmodics: Based on secondary sources, celery may have antispasmodic activity.
  • Antiulcer agentsAntiulcer agents: Antiulcer drugs (including H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors) were found to promote IgE formation toward dietary antigens in celery in adult patients (91).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: In in vitro study, celery showed some antioxidant activity (43; 44; 45; 49; 50; 46). The flavonoid glycosides and limonene in celery seed reportedly have high antioxidant activity (48; 46; 44). Other constituents have demonstrated antioxidant effects (44; 49).
  • Cytochrome P450-metabolized herbs and supplementsCytochrome P450-metabolized herbs and supplements: Based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (97). Celery constituents have been found to inhibit human cytochrome P450 1A2 (hCYP1A2) activity and hCYP1A2-mediated mutagenicity of aflatoxin B1 (327). A higher activity of cytochrome P450 was also detected in maize and celery exposed to the pollutants (328). Pretreatment with celery juices prolonged action of pentobarbital and the analgesic action of aminopyrine and paracetamol in animal study (104).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: According to secondary sources, celery may have diuretic properties.
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: According to secondary sources and case report, celery may have hypotensive activity (96).
  • Insect repellantsInsect repellants: Celery has displayed insecticidal activity (adulticidal and larvicidal), particularly against mosquitoes (337; 338; 80; 339; 79; 340). Various constituents in celery, including sedanolide, senkyunolide-N, and senkyunolide-J, may play a role in its insecticidal activity (339). The essential oil has displayed larvicidal activity against mosquitoes 24 hours after exposure (79). Celery based products have also protected against mosquito bites in clinical trial (112; 324; 81). Most of the products used a combination or had additives that may have affected the outcome (81); it is difficult to deduce the effects of celery alone.
  • Perillyl alcohol-containing agentsPerillyl alcohol-containing agents: According to review, perillyl alcohol is a monoterpene isolated from the essential oils of celery (53).
  • PhotosensitizersPhotosensitizers: Celery contains phenols and furocoumarins (psoralens) (43; 19; 15; 329; 113; 330; 114; 299; 331; 116; 319; 318; 314; 332; 333; 334; 313; 115). These constituents may act as photosensitizers. Theoretically, concurrent use of celery and photosensitizing agents may increase the risk of sun sensitivity.
  • Salicylate-containing herbsSalicylate-containing herbs: In comparative study, treatment of celery cells with salicylic acid resulted in increased mannitol dehydrogenase (MTD) activity and RNA (335). Increased MTD activity resulted in an increased ability to utilize mannitol.
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on mouse study, 3, n-butylphthalide and sedanenolide isolated from celery oil showed weak sedative activity, prolonged pentobarbital narcosis, and induced sleep immediately following recovery from a prior barbiturate treatment (336).
  • Willow barkWillow bark: According to study on food-induced anaphylaxis, ingestion of aspirin and celery in a celery-hypersensitive patient may increase the likelihood of developing food-induced anaphylactic shock (305; 306). Aspirin is based on willow bark extract.

Celery/Food Interactions:
  • Perillyl alcohol-containing foodsPerillyl alcohol-containing foods: According to review, perillyl alcohol is a monoterpene isolated from the essential oils of celery (53).
  • PsoralensPsoralens: According to case report, ingestion of psoralen-containing plants, such as carrot, lemon, lime, dill, fig, grass, oranges, parsley, parsnip, Moraceae and Rutaceae plants, and other Apiaceae/Umbelliferae plants, and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation may cause phytophotodermatitis (15).

Celery/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: According to secondary sources and case report, celery may have hypotensive activity (96).
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Based on review, celery may have anticoagulant or antiplatelet activity (23; 103).
  • Lipid panelLipid panel: Based on rat study, celery extract may reduce serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in celery-treated rats (97; 98; 99). However, based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic triglyceride levels (97).
  • Liver function testsLiver function tests: In animal study, celery extract normalized several liver function tests, including serum transaminases (SGOT and SGPT), alkaline phosphatase, sorbitol dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, bilirubin, total protein, and albumin (74; 75; 59).
  • Serum IgE levelsSerum IgE levels: Based on case report and human study, celery may cause IgE levels to increase in patients hypersensitive to celery (6; 7; 8; 9; 10).
  • Serum levels of cytochrome P450-metabolized agentsSerum levels of cytochrome P450-metabolized agents: Based on rat study, celery extract may increase hepatic microsomal P450 content (97).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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