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Burdock (Arctium lappa)



Interactions

Burdock/Drug Interactions:
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: The antibacterial activity of burdock has been attributed to the presence of polyacetylonenes (35); burdock has been reported to exhibit in vitro activity against Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, Shigella flexneri, and Shigella sonnei.
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Lignans in burdock have been found to inhibit the binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to platelets in rabbits (21) and theoretically may act additively with other anti-platelet agents. Human data are limited.
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: Burdock fruit extracts have demonstrated hypoglycemic activity in rats (17) and may lower blood glucose levels in humans (18; 19; 20). Concomitant use with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents may additively reduce blood glucose levels, and doses may require adjustment.
  • Antigout agentsAntigout agents: Theoretically, burdock may interact with antigout agents.
  • Antinflammatory agentsAntinflammatory agents: In an animal model, subcutaneous administration of Arctium lappa crude extract exhibited free radical scavenging activity and was found to reduce rat paw edema (36). Lignans in burdock exhibited antagonism of platelet activating factor (PAF) binding to platelets in rabbits (21).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Burdock exhibits in vitro cytostatic activity against experimental cancer cell lines and has been found to inhibit the tumor-promoting activity of Epstein-Barr virus in Swiss mice (resulting in inhibition, hemorrhagic necrosis, and liquefaction of tumors) (37; 38). In vitro data have found dismutagenic activity of burdock against 4-NO2-1, 2-DAB, ethidium bromide, and other mutagens (5), which has been attributed to the burdock constituent arctigenin (39). In vitro studies have suggested that fresh burdock juice inhibits DMBA-induced chromosomal abnormalities (40; 41).
  • Antiretroviral agentsAntiretroviral agents: Inhibition of HIV-1 virus infection has been demonstrated in vitro (9). Several lignans are now under investigation as antivirals (particularly anti-HIV) (42).
  • Disulfiram (Antabuse®)Disulfiram (Antabuse®): Tinctures of burdock may contain high concentrations of alcohol (ethanol) and may lead to vomiting if used with disulfiram (Antabuse®).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Oral burdock use has been associated with diuretic effects in HIV patients (8), and may act additively when used concomitantly with diuretic agents, such as chlorothiazide (Diuril®), furosemide (Lasix®), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), or spironolactone (Aldactone®). Evidence is limited.
  • Hormonal agentsHormonal agents: Oral burdock use has been associated with estrogenic effects in HIV patients (8) and may act additively with estrogens. Based on limited human evidence that is not entirely clear, burdock may have estrogen-like properties and may increase the effects of estrogenic agents, including hormone replacement therapies, such as Premarin® or oral contraceptives. Evidence is currently limited.
  • Metronidazole (Flagyl®)Metronidazole (Flagyl®): Tinctures of burdock may contain high concentrations of alcohol (ethanol) and may lead to vomiting if used with metronidazole (Flagyl®).

Burdock/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: The antibacterial activity of burdock has been attributed to the presence of polyacetylonenes (35); burdock has been reported to exhibit in vitro activity against Gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, Shigella flexneri, and Shigella sonnei.
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Lignans in burdock have been found to inhibit the binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to platelets in rabbits (21) and theoretically may act additively with other anti-platelet agents. Human data are currently limited.
  • Antigout herbs and supplementsAntigout herbs and supplements: Theoretically, burdock may interact with antigout herbs and supplements.
  • Antiinflammatory herbsAntiinflammatory herbs: In an animal model, subcutaneous administration of Arctium lappa crude extract exhibited free radical scavenging activity and was found to reduce rat paw edema (36). Lignans in burdock exhibited antagonism of platelet activating factor (PAF) binding to platelets in rabbits (21).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Burdock exhibits in vitro cytostatic activity against experimental cancer cell lines and has been found to inhibit the tumor-promoting activity of Epstein-Barr virus in Swiss mice (resulting in inhibition, hemorrhagic necrosis, and liquefaction of tumors) (37; 38). In vitro data have found dismutagenic activity of burdock against 4-NO2-1, 2-DAB, ethidium bromide, and other mutagens (5), which has been attributed to the burdock constituent arctigenin (39). In vitro studies have suggested that fresh burdock juice inhibits DMBA-induced chromosomal abnormalities (40; 41).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: In an animal model, subcutaneous administration of Arctium lappa crude extract exhibited free radical scavenging activity and was found to reduce rat paw edema (36).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Inhibition of HIV-1 virus infection has been demonstrated in vitro (9). Several lignans are now under investigations as antivirals (particularly anti-HIV) (42).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Oral burdock use has been associated with diuretic effects in HIV patients (8) and may act additively when used concomitantly with diuretic agents. Evidence is limited.
  • GingerGinger: In a human case series from the 1930s, subjects were fed a batter prepared from 90g burdock powder (exposed to low heat), 36g butter, water, salt, saccharin, and several drops of ginger fluid extract. Therefore, burdock may theoretically have increased effects when taken in combination with ginger.
  • Hormonal herbs and supplementsHormonal herbs and supplements: Oral burdock use has been associated with estrogenic effects in HIV patients (8) and may act additively with estrogens. Based on limited human evidence that is not entirely clear, burdock may have estrogen-like properties and may increase the effects of phytoestrogens. Evidence is limited.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Burdock fruit extracts have demonstrated hypoglycemic activity in rats (17) and may lower blood glucose levels in humans (18; 19; 20). Concomitant use with other hypoglycemic agents may additively reduce blood glucose levels and doses may require adjustment.
  • Nondigestible oligosaccharidesNondigestible oligosaccharides: Theoretically, burdock may interact with nondigestible oligosaccharides.
  • PhytoestrogensPhytoestrogens: Oral burdock use has been associated with estrogenic effects in HIV patients (8) and may act additively with estrogenic herbs or supplements. Evidence is currently limited.

Burdock/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Burdock/Lab Interactions:
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Lignans in burdock have been found to inhibit binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to platelets in rabbits (21).
  • Potassium levelsPotassium levels: Burdock has been associated with diuretic effects (increasing urine flow) in one human report and in theory may cause excess fluid loss (dehydration) or electrolyte imbalances (for example, changes in potassium or sodium levels in the blood).
  • Serum glucoseSerum glucose: Burdock fruit extracts have demonstrated hypoglycemic activity in rats (17), and may lower blood glucose levels in humans (18; 19; 20). Although streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice given burdock paradoxically experienced hyperglycemia, the mechanism of burdock's effects on serum glucose is not clear (32) and the clinical relevance of this conflicting report is uncertain.
  • Sodium levelsSodium levels: Burdock has been associated with diuretic effects (increasing urine flow) in one human report and in theory may cause excess fluid loss (dehydration) or electrolyte imbalances (for example, changes in potassium or sodium levels in the blood).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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