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Astragalus(Astragalus membranaceus)



Interactions

Astragalus/Drug Interactions:
  • GeneralGeneral: In theory, consumption of the tragacanth (gummy sap derived from astragalus) may reduce absorption of agents taken by mouth. Therefore, tragacanth and other agents should be taken at separate times.
  • AnestheticsAnesthetics: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may have negative effects on anesthesia.
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: According to animal evidence, astragalus polysaccharide fractions may induce immune responses against bacterial infections (49; 50; 51).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Astragalosides may increase fibrinolysis (11; 17; 18) and theoretically may potentiate the effects of anticoagulant therapy and increase the risk of bleeding.
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: According to animal and human study, astragalus can lower blood glucose (19; 20; 21).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: According to animal and human study, astragalus may lower blood pressure (22; 23; 24; 19; 25). At higher doses, astragalus may increase blood pressure (25).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: According to human evidence, multi-ingredient formulas containing astragalus may decrease total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increase HDL (52; 53). Theoretically, concurrent use of astragalus and antilipemic agents may have additive lipid-lowering effects.
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: There is in vitro evidence that astragalus can potentiate the efficacy and reduce adverse effects of chemotherapy via stimulation of immune function (54; 55; 8). According to human study, astragalus-based formulas may enhance the effects of platinum-based chemotherapy (56).
  • Antiviral agentsAntiviral agents: Astragalus membranaceus lowered viral load and inhibited viral replication of Coxsackie B-3 virus in mice heart tissue (57; 34).
  • Beta blockersBeta blockers: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative inotropic and chronotropic effects which appears to be related to inhibition of beta-adrenergic-mediated responses (22). Theoretically, concurrent use of astragalus and beta blockers may have additive effects.
  • CNS stimulantsCNS stimulants: According to secondary sources, astragalus may potentiate the stimulant effects of CNS stimulants.
  • ColchicineColchicine: According to secondary sources, colchicine may increase the effects of astragalus.
  • CyclophosphamideCyclophosphamide: According to animal evidence, astragalus reduces the immunosuppressive effects of cyclophosphamide (23; 12; 58).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: According to human and animal study, astragalus has diuretic properties (46; 47; 48). Theoretically, concomitant use of astragalus with diuretics may have additive effects.
  • Dopamine agonistsDopamine agonists: According to animal study, long term exposure to 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, may activate the dopaminergic system and result in neurotoxicity (59).
  • Growth hormoneGrowth hormone: Based on laboratory evidence, astragalus may increase growth hormone levels (42).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Based on human and animal study, astragalus appears to stimulate the immune system (11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16) and may alter the effects of immunosuppressant agents.
  • InotropesInotropes: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative inotropic effects (22).
  • InterferonsInterferons: The effects of interferon has been potentiated by astragalus (60; 28; 61; 62; 63).
  • NalbuphineNalbuphine: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may have negative effects on nalbuphine.
  • Neuromuscular blockersNeuromuscular blockers: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may increase the effects of neuromuscular blockers.
  • ProcarbazineProcarbazine: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may potentiate the adverse effects associated with procarbazine.
  • PropoxyphenePropoxyphene: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may potentiate the effects of propoxyphene.
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on secondary sources, sedatives may reduce the effects of astragalus.
  • Radioprotective drugsRadioprotective drugs: In vitro, astragalus has been reported to protect against radiation injury (64) and may potentiate the effects of radioprotective agents.
  • SteroidsSteroids: Astragalus contains triterpenoids and saponins. Because triterpenoids and saponins have a structural similarity to steroid hormone precursors, astragalus may alter the effects of steroids.

Astragalus/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • GeneralGeneral: In theory, the consumption of the tragacanth (gummy sap derived from astragalus) may reduce the absorption of agents taken by mouth. Therefore, tragacanth and other agents should be taken at separate times.
  • AnestheticsAnesthetics: Based on secondary sources, astragalus may have negative effects on anesthesia.
  • Antiadrenergic herbs and supplementsAntiadrenergic herbs and supplements: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative inotropic and chronotropic effects which appears to be related to inhibition of beta-adrenergic-mediated responses (22).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: According to animal study, astragalus polysaccharide fractions may induce immune responses against bacterial infections (49; 50; 51).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Astragalosides may increase fibrinolysis (11; 17; 18), and theoretically may potentiate the effects of anticoagulant therapy and increase the risk of bleeding.
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: According to human evidence, multi-ingredient formulas containing astragalus may decrease total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increase HDL (52; 53). Theoretically, concurrent use of astragalus and antilipemic agents may have additive lipid-lowering effects.
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: There is in vitro evidence that astragalus can potentiate the efficacy and reduce adverse effects of chemotherapy via stimulation of immune function (54; 55; 8). According to human study, astragalus-based formulas may enhance the effects of platinum-based chemotherapy (56).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Astragalus membranaceus lowered viral load and inhibited viral replication of Coxsackie B-3 virus in mice heart tissue (57; 34).
  • Chronotropic herbsChronotropic herbs: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative chronotropic effects which appears to be related to inhibition of beta-adrenergic mediated responses (22).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: According to human and animal study, astragalus has diuretic properties (46; 47; 48). Theoretically, concomitant use of astragalus with diuretics may have additive effects.
  • Dopamine agonistsDopamine agonists: According to animal study, long term exposure to 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, may activate the dopaminergic system and result in neurotoxicity (59).
  • Hormonal herbs and supplementsHormonal herbs and supplements: Astragalus also contains triterpenoids and saponins. Triterpenoids and saponins have a structural similarity to steroid hormone precursors.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: According to animal and human study, astragalus can lower blood glucose (19; 20; 21).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: According to animal and human study, astragalus may lower blood pressure (22; 23; 24; 19; 25). At higher doses, astragalus may increase blood pressure (25).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Based on human and animal study, astragalus appears to stimulate the immune system and may alter the effects of immunosuppressant agents (11; 12; 13; 14; 15; 16).
  • Inotropic herbsInotropic herbs: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative inotropic effects (22).
  • Radioprotective herbs and supplementsRadioprotective herbs and supplements: In vitro, astragalus has been reported to protect against radiation injury (64) and may potentiate the effects of radioprotective herbs and supplements.
  • Rauwolfia alkaloidsRauwolfia alkaloids: Based on anecdotal reports, Rauwolfia alkaloids may alter the effects of astragalus.
  • SedativesSedatives: Based on secondary sources, sedatives may reduce the effects of astragalus.
  • StimulantsStimulants: According to secondary sources, astragalus may potentiate the stimulant effects of CNS stimulants.

Astragalus/Food Interactions:
  • GeneralGeneral: In theory, the consumption of the tragacanth (gummy sap derived from astragalus) may reduce absorption of agents taken by mouth. Therefore, tragacanth and other agents should be taken at separate times.

Astragalus/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: According to animal and human study, astragalus may lower blood pressure (22; 23; 24; 19; 25). At higher doses, astragalus may increase blood pressure (25).
  • Blood glucoseBlood glucose: According to animal and human study, astragalus can lower blood glucose (19; 20; 21).
  • ChlorideChloride: Astragalus may increase the renal excretion of chloride (47).
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Astragalosides may increase fibrinolysis and theoretically may potentiate the effects of anticoagulant therapy and increase the risk of bleeding (11; 17; 18)
  • Growth hormoneGrowth hormone: Astragalus may increase growth hormone levels (42).
  • Heart rateHeart rate: According to animal study, 3-nitropropionic acid, a compound isolated from astragalus, displayed negative inotropic and chronotropic effects which appears to be related to inhibition of beta-adrenergic-mediated responses (22).
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: According to human evidence, multi-ingredient formulas containing astragalus may decrease total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides and increase HDL (52; 53).
  • SodiumSodium: Astragalus may increase the renal excretion of sodium (47).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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