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Aspartic acid



Interactions

Aspartic acid/Drug Interactions:
  • Antigout agentsAntigout agents: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to gout (16).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: In clinical study of patients with moderate hypertension, magnesium aspartate supplementation decreased blood pressure (6).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: In clinical study, arginine aspartate decreased levels of total and LDL cholesterol (18). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Athletic performance enhancement agentsAthletic performance enhancement agents: Based on preliminary study, aspartate salts may enhance aerobic performance. However, whether this is due to aspartic acid, arginine (also an amino acid), or the mineral, is not clear. Limited clinical study suggests that arginine aspartate may reduce plasma ammonia after exercise slightly (8), thus potentially reducing the purported fatigue-inducing effects of ammonia; however, not all studies investigating the effect of aspartate salts agree that performance is enhanced or that plasma ammonia is affected (9; 10; 11; 12).
  • Cardiovascular agentsCardiovascular agents: In clinical study of young anorexic women, potassium aspartate supplementation had beneficial effects on the QT dispersion on an electrocardiogram (5). In clinical study of patients with moderate hypertension, magnesium aspartate supplementation decreased blood pressure (6).
  • CNS stimulantsCNS stimulants: Clinical study suggests that the potassium and magnesium salts of aspartate may have fatigue-reducing effects (1; 2; 3; 4). However, the effects of aspartic acid alone are unclear. Secondary reports suggest that aspartates may be low in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Drugs used for osteoporosisDrugs used for osteoporosis: Based on secondary sources, increased calcium loss with a high-protein diet has been reported.
  • Hepatotoxic agentsHepatotoxic agents: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to liver damage (16).
  • Nephrotoxic agentsNephrotoxic agents: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to kidney damage (16).

Aspartic acid/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Amino acidsAmino acids: Aspartic acid (Asp) is a dispensable (non-essential) amino acid. Intake of aspartic acid in addition to other supplemental amino acids may have unknown additive effects.
  • Antigout herbs and supplementsAntigout herbs and supplements: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to gout (16).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In clinical study, arginine aspartate decreased levels of total and LDL cholesterol (18). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • ArginineArginine: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation increased plasma arginine levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Athletic performance enhancersAthletic performance enhancers: Based on preliminary study, aspartate salts may enhance aerobic performance. However, whether this is due to aspartic acid, arginine (also an amino acid), or the mineral, is not clear. Limited clinical study suggests that arginine aspartate may reduce plasma ammonia after exercise slightly (8), thus potentially reducing the purported fatigue-inducing effects of ammonia; however, not all studies investigating the effect of aspartate salts agree that performance is enhanced or that plasma ammonia is affected (9; 10; 11; 12).
  • CalciumCalcium: Based on review study, excessive protein intake may lead to calcium loss (16).
  • Cardioactive herbsCardioactive herbs: In clinical study of young anorexic women, potassium aspartate supplementation had beneficial effects on the QT dispersion on an electrocardiogram (5). In clinical study of patients with moderate hypertension, magnesium aspartate supplementation decreased blood pressure (6).
  • Hepatotoxic herbs and supplementsHepatotoxic herbs and supplements: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to liver damage (16).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: In clinical study of patients with moderate hypertension, magnesium aspartate supplementation decreased blood pressure (6).
  • MineralsMinerals: Aspartic acid is often paired with various minerals, including iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, or zinc, supposedly to increase absorption of these minerals and to decrease potential gastrointestinal side effects.
  • Nephrotoxic agentsNephrotoxic agents: Based on review study, excessive intake of protein (aspartic acid is an amino acid) may lead to kidney damage (16).
  • Osteoporosis herbs/supplementsOsteoporosis herbs/supplements: Based on secondary sources, increased calcium loss with a high-protein diet has been reported.
  • StimulantsStimulants: Clinical study suggests that the potassium and magnesium salts of aspartate may have fatigue-reducing effects (1; 2; 3; 4). However, the effects of aspartic acid alone are unclear. Secondary reports suggest that aspartates may be low in individuals with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Aspartic acid/Food Interactions:
  • Calcium-containing foodsCalcium-containing foods: Based on review study, excessive protein intake may lead to calcium loss (16).
  • High-protein dietHigh-protein diet: Aspartic acid (Asp) is a dispensable (non-essential) amino acid. Intake of aspartic acid in addition to a high-protein diet may have unknown additive effects.
  • MineralsMinerals: Aspartic acid is often paired with various minerals, including iron, copper, magnesium, manganese, or zinc, supposedly to increase absorption of these minerals and to decrease potential gastrointestinal side effects. Thus, aspartic acid may increase absorption of minerals from foods.
  • Non-protein-containing foodsNon-protein-containing foods: Secondary reports suggest that aspartic acid is more beneficial for athletic performance when taken as a supplement without protein.

Aspartic acid/Lab Interactions:
  • AmmoniaAmmonia: Secondary sources suggest that aspartate salts may reduce the accumulation of ammonia during aerobic exercise. Limited clinical study suggests that arginine aspartate may reduce plasma ammonia after exercise slightly (8); however, not all studies investigating the effect of aspartate salts agree that performance is enhanced or that plasma ammonia is affected (9; 10; 11; 12).
  • ArginineArginine: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation increased plasma arginine levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: In clinical study of patients with moderate hypertension, magnesium aspartate supplementation decreased blood pressure (6).
  • Free fatty acidsFree fatty acids: Secondary sources suggest that aspartate use increases free fatty acid use in the blood.
  • GlucagonGlucagon: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation increased plasma glucagon levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Insulin-like growth factorInsulin-like growth factor: In humans, arginine aspartate increased levels of serum insulin-like growth factor (18; 7). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: In humans, arginine aspartate decreased levels of total and LDL cholesterol (18). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Muscle glycogenMuscle glycogen: Secondary sources suggest that aspartate use spares muscle glycogen. In animals, potassium aspartate had no effect on muscle glycogen (19).
  • Plasma amino acidsPlasma amino acids: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation decreased plasma amino acid levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • Somatotropic hormoneSomatotropic hormone: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation increased plasma somatotropic hormone levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.
  • UreaUrea: In humans, arginine aspartate supplementation increased plasma urea levels (10). The effect of aspartic acid alone is unclear.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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